Alvarado Campaign Staff Turnover a Cause for Concern?

Most election observers thought Teresa Alvarado’s second-place finish in the June 4 primary exceeded expectations. Coming within 10 percentage points of Cindy Chavez for the District 2 county supervisor seat was seen as a momentum-builder, considering Alvarado’s campaign didn’t really get its act together until the final two weeks. But not everyone agreed—namely, Alvarado. Shortly after election night, Alvarado dismissed her entire campaign staff.

Campaign Coordination: A (Legally Interpretive) Labor of Love

The Fair Political Practices Commission awarded a cookie last week to Cindy Chavez, champ of Tuesday’s county supervisor primary. FPPC Chief Enforcement Officer Gary Winuk ruled that mass mailers shared between Chavez, the county Democratic party and the South Bay Labor Council followed the Political Reform Act to the letter, which must mean it was written in some kind of Cyrillic and Arabic scramble. Part of the ruling stated that anyone who registers with a party is considered a member, even if they don’t pay dues, which means a party’s candidate of choice basically has an unlimited amount of coordinated funds at their disposal.

Progressives, Conservatives Form Tense Partnership to Defeat Chavez

Cindy Chavez is a people-uniter. How else could one explain why so many incongruous political actors of varying stripes are singing Kumbaya as they work to defeat her in the county supervisor race to replace George Shirakawa Jr. Progressives and conservatives in Silicon Valley are teaming up to battle the Chavistas, and it’s causing some friction for top opponent Teresa Alvarado as she stitches together a coalition.